Player's Handbook

Go back home!

Home

Join our Forum!

Leave a message in our Guestbook!

Check out our Download section!

Sign up for our weekly newsletter!

Checkout the links we like!

Send a mail to our staff!


Read the fantastic Stories of Gushémal!

Read Travellers' Tales from the world of Gushémal!

Learn how to play the Gushémal Role-Playing Game!


Back to the Index

 

<= Previous Page / Next Page =>

4.  Class (3)

4.4. Thief

For good reason thieves have a bad reputation everywhere, but they still exist (in plenty, one might add.) Every culture, every race has produced the kind of persons who earn their money by way of other people’s efforts.

There are various kinds of thieves. Those who lurk in well populated streets and plazas to steal the wallets are probably the most common. But there are also those who break into houses, there are con-men and swindlers. Some rely on their nimble fingers, some on their athletic abilities, and some try to ambush people in dark and lonely alleys with a knife.

As different as the methods are the motives of thieves. Many were born in poverty and have learned no other way to fend for their life. Others have taken a bad turn in their lives’ roads, still others have developed a moral code that allows them to steal only from the rich, perhaps to give to the poor (and keep the bare necesities for themselves.) Some thieves have been born rich and have no need to steal; they do so for the thrill.

 

Good thieves are in high demand in many ways. Oftentimes they form guilds to most effectively rob a city – without taking each other’s loot. The guilds have strict rules to avoid conflict within; the thieves are assigned areas of activity, specific heists have to be announced and cleared with the guild. Newcomers who don’t join the guild but still ply their trade usually find themselves faced with the wrath of the established thieves, not a pleasant prospect.

Adventurer parties also might require the services of an experienced thief. One needs only think of locked doors and traps in dungeons that might otherwise seal the fates of the adventurers.

Thieves can also find themselves as spies who steal no valuable objects but information.

 

The player who desires to play a thief in GRPG should be aware that most nations have placed severe penalties on theft. If caught, the character might lose one hand, or he might be hung, or he might face many years of incarceration.

 

4.4.1. Class Abilities

Climbing:                                                                        2,000 EP

The thief is able to scale a wall without any tools, as long as this is physically feasible (i.e. the wall must not be absolutely smooth; there must be grooves which the thief can use.)

This ability requires a check whether it succeeds. The player has to make a percentage roll against the base value (which at first is half his character’s agility). The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

 

Hiding:                                                                            2,000 EP

The thief is able to hide in shadows, as well as in rooms or corridors that ordinarily offer little hiding space. With this ability, the thief is still likely to find some spot where he cannot be detected – unless the guard decides to look in that very spot.

This ability requires a check whether it succeeds. The player has to make a percentage roll against the base value (which at first is half his character’s agility). The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

 

Listen:                                                                             2,000 EP

The thief has been trained to listen and is able to register and judge the tiniest of noises.

This ability requires one roll to find out whether the thief notices a noise at all. If successful, a second roll can deliver additional information, e.g. what the noise was, or whether a voice sounds male or female.

The base value for the listen check is 40. Enhancing it costs 100 EP per base value point.

 

Move silently:                                                                  2,000 EP

As the name indicates the thief is able to move without making much noise.

This ability requires a check whether it succeeds. The base value for the check is half the character’s agility value. But it isn’t the player who rolls the dice but the GM, who does so in secret without informing the player whether his character is in fact moving silently. (The character probably will find out anyway if he is discovered.)

The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

 

Open Locks:                                                                     2,000 EP

The thief has learned to open locks, but he needs a set of lockpicks for this task. If he doesn’t have them, his success rate is lessened.

This ability requires a check whether it succeeds. The player has to make a percentage roll against the base value (which at first is half his character’s agility). The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

 

Pick Pockets:                                                                   2,000 EP

The thief is able to steal money or wallet from other people’s pockets without their noticing.

This ability requires a check whether it succeeds. The player has to make a percentage roll against the base value (which at first is half his character’s agility value). The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

If successful, the GM determines how much the thief has stolen.

 

Throwing:                                                                       1,500 EP

The character receives a +10 bonus on weapons that have to be thrown, e.g. throwing axes or knives.

 

Tightrope Walking:                                                         3,000 EP

The thief is able to walk over tight ropes but also over narrow beams. If he uses a balancing staff (for which a broomstick might suffice), he receives a +20 bonus.

This ability requires a check whether it succeeds. The player has to make a percentage roll against the base value (which at first is half his character’s agility). The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

 

Traps:                                                                              3,000 EP

The thief has already gathered experience with traps – not surprising since they are one of the typical dangers of his chosen profession. As a result thieves had better learn how to detect and avoid them.

If a player suspects there is a trap ahead of him, he must inform the GM that he intends to search for a trap. The GM rolls the dice for the check in secret. He does not reveal whether the throw – i.e. the character’s search – was successful.

The reason for that is simple: Not every place checked has a trap. If that should be the case, the GM still ought to roll a check and then decide freely what to tell the player. (After all, the character might think he’s found a trap, and then he’ll waste some time disarming it – “waste” since there is nothing.)

If there is indeed a trap, and the character has found it, the GM describes the set-up of the trap. Then the player can roll another check against his skill to see whether he can disarm it.

The base value of this check is half the character’s intelligence value. The base value can be increased at a cost of 100 EP per base value point.

 

Tumbling:                                                                       1,000 EP

The character has been taught how to fall “the right way”, which means he has learned how to hit the ground in such a way that the damage is minimized.

He suffers only half the normal damage (cf. Game Master Guide).

 

Unarmed Combat:                  1,000 EP

Text Box: Weapon Mastery Level
Level	Price
Level 1 (depends on class)	-
Level 2 (1 – 50)	1,000 EP
Level 3 (51 – 74)	2,500 EP
Level 4 (74 – 99)	5,000 EP
Level 5 (100 – 150)	10,000 EP

This style of fighting is so easy that anyone can use it – depending on their abilities, of course. The base value for this style is the same as the base value of the character class, i.e. 25% for fighters, 20% for priests, 15% for thieves and 10% for wizards.

Add to this the strength bonus and further practice. An inexperienced fistfighter receives only half his normal values.

Otherwise unarmed combat is considered a weapons ability, and therefore the rules of Weapon Mastery apply. To increase your experience, you need to spend 100 EP per increased point.

 

<= Previous Page / Next Page =>